Free Things to do in Paris

Paris is the fifth most visited city in the world, and it’s not too difficult to see why when you think of the history, architecture, culture, cuisine and fashion that abounds there. Unfortunately, all those visitors and all those wonderful things that make it so worth visiting mean the prices can get pretty steep. But if you’re poor in Paris, like me, don’t worry! There’s still plenty to see and do, especially if you’re there in warmer months.

If you’re an EU resident under the age of 26 – and please note that if you hold a long-term visa, such as a student or working visa, you count as a resident – you’re especially in luck, thanks to the Parisian tourist board’s generous decision to grant free access to many of its monuments and museums, and there’s a whole new gamut of options available to you.

Monuments – to look at

To get an idea of why people rave about the monuments and architecture in Paris, it suffices to go glance at a few of the most impressive examples. Most of these can be entered upon paying a fee but you can admire them from the outside quite freely.

Opèra Garnier (Academie Nationale de la Musique) – Metro lines 3, 7 Opèra
Built between 1861 and 1875 by Charles Garnier, this magnificent Italian-style building is still used for performances as well as hosting a museum. Walk down the Avenue de l’Opèra to gaze at beautiful things you can’t afford and to get yourself an excellent view of the dome, which can’t be seen if you’re standing right in front of it.

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The Panthèon – Metro line 10, Maubert-Mutualité or Cardinal Lemoine
Intended to be a church, this temple-like building in the Greek style is now an enormous state mausoleum, housing the remains of numerous important French citizens such as Balzac and Voltaire. 

Arc de Triomphe – Metro line 2, Kleber or line 1, George V
Arguably one of the most well-known sights of the city, the Arc de Triomphe features an observation deck at its summit, a small collection focused on the Revolution, and many, many stairs. It’s visible the length of the Champs-Elysées, a street filled with big brand names, from Mango to Louis Vuitton. Hop off line 1 earlier, at George-Clemenceau, to peek at the Petit Palais and Grand Palais and approach the Arc from there. 

The Eiffel Tower – Metro line 8, Ecole Militaire, line 6 or 9, Trocadéro, or line 6, Bir-Hakeim
It’s almost impossible to spend any time in Paris without catching a glimpse of its most iconic tower, but it’s worth seeing up close nonetheless. Originally a temporary installation for the World Fair of 188, held in Paris, this striking work of Gustav Eiffel is now the top most visited monument in the world. 

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Monuments – to go inside

Thankfully, there’s quite a number of famous things to visit which are free to enter – generally because they’re churches or cemeteries. Just because you might not be a fan of Christianity, though, don’t skip these fabulous examples of decoration and architecture, and let yourself be lost in imagining the history behind them.

Notre-Dame de Paris – Metro line 4, Cité
Generally considered the first major example of Gothic architecture, this astoundingly ornate cathedral was finished in 1250 after more than 100 years work and 3 different architects. It’s free to enter, but be prepared to queue – fortunately, the lines usually move quickly. To get away from the bustle of other tourists, walk round to the back to admire its buttresses and gargoyles in relative peace in the small park there.

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Sacre-Coeur – Metro line 2, Anvers or line 12, Abbesses 
Visible upon its hill from many vantage-points within the city, the pale white walls of the Sacre-Coeur look down upon the Square Louise-Michel, a grassy slope filled to bursting with tourists and locals soaking up sunshine when they get the chance. Consecrated in 1919, this surprisingly modern church is set apart from others in Paris both by its imposing location and Romano-Byzantine inspiration.

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La Madeleine – Metro lines 12 or 14, Madeleine
Another demonstration of the mania for Greek-inspired architecture around in the 19th century, this huge church from 1842 is rarely crowded despite its gorgeous interior. Used today for religious services as well as musical performances, thanks to its excellent acoustics, the Madeleine has played host to the funeral of celebrated pianist Chopin.

Père Lachaise Cemetery – Metro line 2, Père Lachaise or line 3, Gambetta
Possibly the most famous of all the Parisian cemeteries, this burial-ground has been accepting bodies since 1804 but is now most known for its abundance of famous graves. Check out the final resting places of Edith Piaf, Oscar Wilde and Jim Morrison, among others, or just appreciate the excessive ornamentation of some of the tombs. 

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Parks

If the sun’s out, so are the Parisians! Even if it’s a pale kind of light, and the air is yet chilly, they’ll be availing themselves of the multitude of public parks within in the city, and so should you be. There’s plenty of them to be discovered, but a few stand out from the rest.

Parc Monceau – Metro line 2, Monceau
This large park features a number of old-fashioned ‘follies’ – bizarre structures built purely for the sake of making the place more interesting – dating from the late 18th century. Unlike many of the kept parks in Paris, you can throw yourself down on the grass to picnic, read or sunbathe. 

Jardins de Luxembourg – Metro line 4, Odèon or Saint-Sulplice 
Probably the most well known of Paris’ public parks, the gardens surrounding the Palais de Luxembourg are ‘à la francaise’, which means your seating choice is limited to the ubiquitous green metal chairs laid out for that specific use, despite the strips of fresh green grass. Feel free, though, to move the chairs anywhere you want, whether that’s arranging a circle of your friends or dragging it close up to the large basin where children sail toy boats on the water in summertime. 

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The Jardins de Luxembourg are particularly worth visiting in the warmer months, when all kinds of flowers and potted trees are distributed round the grounds.

Parc de Buttes-Chaumont – Metro line 7 bis, Buttes-Chaumont
A huge park incorporating several slopes and hills within its boundaries, Buttes-Chaumont is entirely artificial – used as a rubbish dump until halfway through the 19th century, major landscaping was required to form the ‘buttes’ (slopes), grottoes, lake and small mountain that today form such a delightful getaway from the busyness of city life. Even on nice days, the park doesn’t feel nearly as crowded as those closer to the city centre, due both to its location and superior size.