St-Germain-des-Prés (6th arrondissement)

This area is known for its connections to art and literature, as well as hosting some impressive architecture like the Palais de Luxembourg. It’s on the more expensive side, and appeals to those interested in culture.

Start at Metro stop St-Germain-des-Prés (line 4), and admire the church immediately beside you, Eglise de Saint-Germain-des-Prés. It dates from the 6th century, when it was erected by Childebert, the son of the first King of France, Clovis. The tomb of René Descartes, famous mathematician and logician, can be found in its side chapels.

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If you’re in the mood for something sweet, pick up a traditional waffle or crêpe at the stand right outside the Metro entrance – it has a long established reputation for delivering cheap, sugary pleasure. If you’re looking for something more lux, head straight down rue Bonaparte towards Ladurée’s, a famous patisserie and tea salon that’s been around since 1861. It’s especially known for its macarons, though the cakes are delicious as well, but prices start at 2.50 for a mini-macaron and around 6 euros for the cheapest cake. That’s at take-away prices, too!

 

 

If money doesn’t concern you too much, and you want to relive the lives of famous authors, look across the street from the church to find the first of the three cafes patronised by long-gone intellectuals. Les Deux Magots is particularly known for playing host to Rimbaud, Picasso and Hemingway, while Café des Flores right next door was the favourite of luminaries such as Apollinaire, Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Trotsky. Each café lays claim to particular known names, but in fact the writers and thinkers generally frequented both businesses. They serve traditional French café fare, such as chocolat chaud a l’ancienne, but beware: a simple espresso starts at around 4 to 5 euros. Just across the road, the Lipp brasserie was also part of the handful of establishments beloved by the artists. Founded by an Alsatian couple, it was known for its food from that region – think sauerkraut, remoulade and beer – and now is famous for its excellent mille-feuille.

Moving eastwards along the Boulevard St Germain, you can take a left turn at Rue de l’Echaude to seek out the National Museum of Eugeune Delacroix, the famous painter. While it doesn’t have many of his famous works, it’s interesting to see his studio and house (and free for EU residents under 26), chosen specifically for its proximity to Eglise de Saint-Sulplice, where he painted one of the chapels. That’s worth a visit too, and is a short walk down the same rue Boneparte that leads to Laduree’s, but in the southerly direction.

Keep heading down the Boulevard if your stomach’s rumbling now, and just a few steps down Rue de l’Ancienne Comedie on your left, you can peek at the marvellous creations at Éclair de Genie, which features éclairs with fillings and toppings a little beyond the regular chocolate pastry cream. Le Procope, which holds the title of the oldest restaurant in Paris, is just before it.

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The éclair au caramel, one of the specialities of Eclair du Genie

Alternatively, turn right at rue de l’Odeon and walk towards the imposing Odeon Theatre. Behind it, you’ll find the Palais de Luxembourg and its famous adjoining gardens, which feature large basins used for toy sailing boats in summer and plenty of people, both locals and tourists, whenever the sun is out. The palace was built by the Italian wife of King Henry IV, Marie de Medici, after her husband died and is modelled on a palace from Marie’s native Florence. Now, the building is the seat of the French Senate, and the former orangery has become the Musée de Luxembourg which holds regular art exhibitions. The Boulevard Saint-Michel, so named for the huge decorative fountain found at its northern end, marks the end of 6th arrondissement, and the beginning of the Latin Quarter.

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The Latin Quarter (5th arrondissement)

Perfect for those with more time than money, especially if you’re eligible for free entry into museums and monuments, the Latin Quarter is generally considered the domain of students, hosting as it does the original university of Paris, the Sorbonne. 

Hop off the Metro at Saint Michel (line 4) to start exploring the Latin Quarter’s twisting streets. Taking the ( ) sortie, you’ll find a small labyrinth of narrow streets that seem to host nothing but tourist restaurants offering shockingly cheap 3 course menus, kebab stores and the occasional window of a crêpe store. Skip the restaurants unless you’re desperate for a very tiny serve of bouef bourguignon; if you really need to grab some energy before starting your adventure, pay a visit at Crêperie Genia to take advantage of their super-cheap formule – one savoury crepe or panini, one sweet crepe and a drink for 5 euros or less. If books are your thing, walk straight down rue de la Huchette and cross the road to find the world-famous bookstore and its attached café, Shakespeare and Co. In any case, continue down rue Saint-Jacques, perhaps with a quick detour to see Eglise Saint-Severin and eventually you’ll reach Boulevard Saint-Germain.

To the right, there’s the Musee de Cluny, the national museum of the Middle Ages. It’s mostly housed in a hotel particulier with foundations from the 14th century, and is partially built on the ruins of an ancient Roman bathhouse. It’s free to EU residents under 26, and known for its tapestry collection La Dame et la Licorne (The Lady and the Unicorn). Continuing straight ahead, though, you’ll pass by the Universite Paris-Sorbonne and arrive at rue Soufflot, from which you’ll immediately noticed the impressive dome of the Pantheon. If you avoid being distracted by the beautiful rose-shaped ice creams of Amorino Gelato, which has numerous outlets around the centre of Paris – you may have noticed it in the twisting streets near the Notre Dame, the Pantheon is well worth your time. This imposing state mausoleum built in the late 18th century holds the bones of many a famous name, from Voltaire to Marie Curie to Louis Braille and is free entry to EU residents under 26.

 


If you’re above the age limit and not up for paying entry prices, glance to the left of its stately façade to find the asymmetrical front of 16th century Eglise St-Etienne-de-Mont. Note the intricately carved bridge above the altar, known as a rood loft – it’s the only church remaining in Paris to feature one. There’s also, for those still eager to pay their respects to a tomb or two, the remains of mathematician Blaise Pascal and dramatist Jean Racine.

 

Once you’re done with the church, hop back to the right-hand side of the Pantheon and follow the signs for rue Mouffetard, a haunt of university students jampacked with cafés, boutiques, bars and small restaurants. If you didn’t pick something up at the very start, be sure to try the enormous and excellent value crepes at au P’tit Grec.

At the sight of the large church on your left, take rue Daubenton and follow it faithfully until you find a building that seems a little out of place in Paris: namely, the Oriental-looking tower that signals you’ve arrived at the Grand Mosque. It’s only 3 euros entry fee to visit the beautiful gardens, or you can settle for nibbling on rich honeyed pastries and mint tea in the garden. There’s a full restaurant available, but the oriental cakes are truly delicious.

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Inside the gardens of the Grand Mosque – note that appropriate clothing is required, and you may have to wrap a makeshift skirt around your legs to gain entry!

Once you’ve regained your forces, move your focus to what lies just across the road. You can examine some exotic animals close up at the Musée d’Histoire Naturelle (free for young EU residents), or if you prefer your beasts living and breathing, make your way through the delightful Jardin des Plantes to the far left corner, which houses a menagerie you can visit. It’s a gorgeous place to picnic or just soak up the sunshine, and the Grand Serres (greenhouses) in the centre present fascinating mini-ecosystems – if you’re willing to pay the entry fee, you can visit a tiny patch of New Caledonia, the tropics and the desert all in one hour!

Exiting the Jardin des Plantes will leave you facing the Seine, from whence you may choose to stroll along its calm banks or perhaps to cross the Pont d’Austerlitz to get to the 4th or 12th arrondissements.